April 16 – 18, 2024

Focus Period Symposium: Security and Fault Tolerance of Cyber-Physical Systems

Akademiska Föreningen, Lund

We want to plant the seed for a radical rethinking of the way cyber-physical systems are constructed, questioning their fundamental principles and striving for constructions that are secure, safe, controllable, and dependable from the beginning.

The ELLIIT Focus Period Symposium is the highlight of the five-week focus period, during which young international scholars, ELLIIT researchers and other well-established international academics gathered in Lund to work together in these joint research challenges.

Register by the 24th of March the latest.

Detailed program

Please note that the program is still subject to change, and will be complemented by titles and abstract continuously.

April 15, 2024

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17:00 - 19:00

Skånemotor

Kungsgatan 4, 223 50 Lund

Welcome reception

A welcome drink and some hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Day 1 – April 16, 2024

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08:30 - 09:00

AF-Borgen

Registration

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09:00 - 09:30

Opening

Martina Maggio and Anders Rantzer, Lund University

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09:30 - 10:00

Mikael Asplund, Linköping University (Sweden)

Biography

Mikael Asplund is a Senior Associate Professor in Computer Science at Linköping University (LiU). He received his M.Sc. degree in computer science and engineering and the Ph.D.degree in computer science from LiU, in 2005 and 2011, respectively. From 2011 to 2012, he was a Research Fellow with Trinity College Dublin. He currently leads five research projects on cybersecurity and is responsible for two Master programs at LiU. His research is focused on methods for rigorous security of cyber-physical systems.
Michela Milano
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10:00 - 10:30

Bruno Sinopoli, Washington University in St. Louis (USA)

Biography

Sinopoli’s research focuses on robust and resilient design of cyberphysical systems, networked and distributed control systems, distributed interference in networks, smart infrastructures, wireless sensor and actuator networks, cloud computing, adaptive video streaming applications and energy systems.

Sinopoli comes to Washington University from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was a professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and co-director of the Smart Infrastructure Institute. He also had appointments in the Robotics Institute and in Mechanical Engineering.

In 2010, he received the George Tallman Ladd Research Award from the Carnegie Institute of Technology at Carnegie Mellon, as well as an NSF CAREER Award, which is awarded to junior faculty who model the role of teacher-scholar through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research.

He joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon as an assistant professor in 2007. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University.

Hector-Geffner
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10:30 - 11:00

Coffee

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11:00 - 11:30

Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

Biography

Prof. Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi is a distinguished Full Professor of Computer Science at the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, where he also leads the System Security Lab. His academic journey includes conducting a Ph.D. in Computer Science with a specialization in Cryptography from the University of Saarland, Germany. Prior to his academic career, Prof. Sadeghi contributed significantly to the Research and Development sector of the Telecommunications industry, notably with Ericsson.

Since 2012, Prof. Sadeghi has fostered a close collaboration with Intel, leading several Collaborative Research Centers addressing diverse topics such as Secure Computing in Mobile and Embedded Systems, Autonomous and Resilient Systems, and Private AI. In 2019, he further expanded his lab by establishing the Open Lab for Sustainable Security and Safety (OpenS3 Lab) in partnership with Huawei.

His research focus spans various domains, including Trustworthy Computing Platforms, Hardware-assisted Security, IoT Security and Privacy, Applied Cryptography, and Trustworthy AI. Prof. Sadeghi has played pivotal roles in numerous national and international research and development projects, emphasizing the design and implementation of secure and trustworthy technologies.

He has served as General or Program Chair and Program Committee member of major Information Security and Privacy and Design and Automation conferences and events. Prof. Sadeghi has notably contributed as the Editor-In-Chief of IEEE Security and Privacy Magazine and served on editorial boards for respected publications such as ACM TISSEC, IEEE TCAD, ACM Books, ACM DIOT, ACM TODAES, and ACM DTRAP.

Prof. Sadeghi’s exceptional contributions to the field have earned him prestigious awards. In 2008, he was awarded the esteemed German “Karl Heinz Beckurts” prize for his influential research in Trusted and Trustworthy Computing technology, acknowledging its impactful transfer to industrial practice. In 2010, his group received the German IT Security Competition Award. In 2018, he was honored with the ACM SIGSAC Outstanding Contributions Award, recognizing his dedicated research, education, and management leadership in the security community, with pioneering contributions in content protection, mobile security, and hardware-assisted security.
The year 2021 brought further recognition with the Intel Academic Leadership Award at USENIX Security, acknowledging Prof. Sadeghi’s influential research in information and computer security, particularly in hardware-assisted security. In 2022, he was awarded with the prestigious European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant, solidifying his position as a leading figure in advancing cutting-edge research in computer science and security.

Luc-De-Raedt
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11:30 - 12:00

Miroslav Pajic, Duke University (USA)

Biography

Miroslav Pajic is the Dickinson Family Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University. He also holds a secondary appointment in the Computer Science Department, and the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science. His research interests focus on the design and analysis of high-assurance cyber-physical systems with varying levels of autonomy and human interaction, at the intersection of (more traditional) areas of AI, learning and controls, embedded systems, robotics and formal methods.

Dr. Pajic received various awards including the NSF CAREER Award, ONR Young Investigator Program  Award, ACM SIGBED Early-Career Researcher Award, IEEE TCCPS Early-Career Award, IBM Faculty Award, ACM SIGBED Frank Anger Memorial Award, the Joseph and Rosaline Wolf Dissertation Award from Penn Engineering, as well as eight Best Paper and Runner-up Awards, such as the Best Paper Awards at the 2017 ACM SIGBED International Conference on Embedded Software (EMSOFT) and 2014 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS), and the Best Student Paper award at the 2012 IEEE Real-Time and Embedded Technology and Applications Symposium (RTAS). He is an associate editor in the ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems and ACM Transactions Computing for Healthcare (ACM HEALTH), and was a Chair of the 2019 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS’19).

Adnan Darwiche
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12:00 - 12:30

Alessandro Biondi​, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna Pisa (Italy)

Biography

Alessandro Biondi is Associate Professor of Computer Engineering at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna of Pisa (Italy), where he works at the Real-Time Systems (ReTiS) Laboratory.

His main research interests include the design and implementation of real-time, safe, and secure cyber-physical systems, operating systems and hypervisors, synchronization protocols, design optimization for embedded systems, and formal analysis of scheduling algorithms.

He graduated cum laude in Computer Engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy, within the excellence program. In 2017, he received a PhD cum laude in Emerging Digital Technologies (curriculum Embedded Systems) at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna under the supervision of Prof. Giorgio Buttazzo and Prof. Marco Di Natale.
In 2016, he has been Visiting Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems in Kaiserslautern (Germany), where he worked with Prof. Bjoern B. Brandenburg.

He was the recipient of several awards including the IEEE TCCPS Early Career Award 2023, the ACM SIGBED Early Career Award 2019, six Best Paper Awards, one Best Journal Paper Award (IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics), one Outstanding Paper Award, one Best Presentation Award, the EDAA Outstanding Dissertation Award 2017 in the area “New directions in software design and optimization for embedded, cyber-physical and secure systems”.

Alessandro Biondi has been involved as member of the Program Committee of top conferences in the area of real-time, embedded, and cyber-physical systems. He is Associate Editor of Journal of Real-Time Systems (Springer), the major journal on time-critical computing, and he served as reviewer for most IEEE/ACM Transactions journals that cover research on embedded and cyber-physical systems. He served as TPC Vice-Chair of EMSOFT 2023, TPC Chair of EMSOFT 2024, and TPC Track Co-Chair of ETFA 2023 and 2022.

He published several papers in international conferences, quality journals, and workshops, and filed two patents. He is currently leading industrial research projects in the area of safety-critical and secure software systems for automotive and railway industries, and he has been involved in research projects funded by the European Commission.

Alessandro Biondi is also co-founder of Accelerat SRL, a spin-off company focused on software solutions for safe, secure, and predictable cyber-physical systems.

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12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

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14:00 - 14:30

Michelle Chong, TU/e (The Netherlands)

Biography

Michelle Chong is an assistant professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering in Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands. She obtained her undergraduate and PhD degrees from the University of Melbourne, Australia. She has held postdoctoral positions in KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Lund University and the University of California Santa Barbara. She is the American Australian Association’s ConocoPhillips postdoctoral fellow in 2013 and won the best paper award for ACM/IEEE 7th International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016. Her research interests are on nonlinear and hybrid dynamical systems (such as cyber-physical systems, networked systems, multi-agent systems and autonomous systems) with applications in power systems, neuroscience and robotics. One of her current research focus is on the security, safety and privacy of cyber-physical systems.
Neil Yorke-Smith
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14:30 - 15:00

Gene Tsudik, University of California, Irvine (USA)

Biography

Gene Tsudik is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). He obtained his PhD in
Computer Science from USC. Before coming to UCI in 2000, he was at the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory (1991-1996) and
USC/ISI (1996-2000). His research interests include numerous topics in security, privacy and applied cryptography.
Gene Tsudik was a Fulbright Scholar and a Fulbright Specialist (thrice). He is a fellow of ACM, IEEE, AAAS, IFIP, and a foreign member of
Academia Europaea. From 2009 to 2015 he served as Editor-in-Chief of ACM TOPS. He was the recipient of 2017 ACM SIGSAC
Outstanding Contribution, 2020 IFIP Jean-Claude Laprie, and 2023 ACM SIGSAC Outstanding Innovation awards.
His magnum opus is the first ever rhyming crypto-poem published as a refereed paper. Gene Tsudik is allergic to over-hype of
machine learning, blockchains/cryptocurrencies, and differential privacy. He has no social media presence.
Panos M Pardalos
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15:00 - 15:30

Cybersecurity in real-time cyber-physical systems

Bryan Ward​, Vanderbilt University (USA)

Abstract

Many cyber-physical systems include sensing and control processing that have real-time processing requirements due to the nature of the interactions with the physical world. As such systems are becoming increasingly network connected, such as with the (Industrial) Internet of Things, such systems are also becoming smarter and more capable. However, such connectivity also exposes vectors for remote attackers to exploit vulnerable CPSs. To prevent such attacks, defenses are needed that prevent such attacks from succeeding, without compromising the real-time performance of the requirements of the system to begin with. This presentation will discuss several approaches to developing real-time security mechanisms that are designed for predictable performance and are amenable to real-time analysis.

Biography

Bryan Ward is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Vanderbilt University. His research interests include systems security, operating systems, and real-time and embedded systems, and especially the intersection of these topics. Prior to joining Vanderbilt in Fall 2022, he was a member of the technical staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in the Secure and Resilient Systems and Technology Group where he worked on research projects on real-time systems and operating-system security for national security especially in the context of embedded systems such as satellites and industrial control systems. He was honored with the 2021 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Outstanding Mentor Award. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016, where he was also a recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. He earned a B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering and a B.A. in Mathematics at Bucknell University, where he was also the recipient of the 2009 Barry Goldwater Scholarship. He is a senior member of the IEEE.
Andrea Lodi
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15:30 - 17:00

Lightning talks

Day 2 – April 17, 2024

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09:00 - 09:30

Elena Troubitsyna, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)

Biography

From 2022 Full Professor in Computer Science, KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer.

The development of autonomous, safe and reliable software-intensive systems, such as self-driving cars, drones or various robots, constitutes a major engineering challenge. Current software development methods are unable to efficiently and confidently cope with the enormous system complexity and deliver the required assurance of system trustworthiness in the presence of continuous learning and adaptation. The goal of Elena Troubitsyna’s research is to foster the development of dependable, autonomous systems that are safe and reliable. Her focus is on the design of dependability-assurance solutions for autonomous systems, including the models and algorithms for surveillance, diagnostics and adaptation.

By using rigorous mathematical modelling and verification techniques, Elena’s research contributes to the development of methods and technologies that enable autonomous systems with formally proven safety and reliability. Elena’s research also includes the design of AI algorithms that will empower systems to learn and adapt in real time.

The deployment of autonomous systems promises to bring various benefits to society, provided that powerful methods to achieve their safety and reliability are developed.

Andrea Lodi
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09:30 - 10:00

Saman Zounoz, Georgia Tech (USA)

Biography

Saman Zonouz is an Associate Professor at Georgia Tech in the Schools of Cybersecurity and Privacy (SCP) and Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). Saman directs the Cyber-Physical Security Laboratory (CPSec) which recently hosted a U.S. Congressional visit to demonstrate its research outcomes. His research focuses on security and privacy research problems in cyber-physical systems including attack detection and response capabilities using techniques from systems security, control theory and artificial intelligence. His research has been awarded by Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) by the United States President, the NSF CAREER Award in Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), Significant Research in Cyber Security by the National Security Agency (NSA), Faculty Fellowship Award by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), Google Hall of Fame Security Award, Provost Research Award, and Cybersecurity Fellowship by the College of Engineering. His research group has disclosed several security vulnerabilities with published CVEs in widely-used industrial controllers such as Siemens, Allen Bradley, and Wago. Saman is currently a Co-PI on President Biden’s American Rescue Plan $65M Georgia AI Manufacturing (GA-AIM) project. Saman was invited to co-chair the NSF CPS PI Meeting as well as the NSF CPS Next Big Challenges Workshop. Saman has served as the chair and/or program committee member for several conferences (e.g., IEEE S&P, USENIX, CCS, NDSS, DSN, and ICCPS). Saman obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Andrea Lodi
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10:00 - 10:30

Nils Ole Tippenhauer, CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security (Germany)

Biography

Nils Tippenhauer is a faculty at the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security in Germany. Until 2018, Nils was an Assistant Professor at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD). He earned his Dr. Sc. in Computer Science from ETH Zurich (Switzerland) in 2012.

Nils Tippenhauer is interested in information security aspects of practical systems. In particular, Nils is currently working on security of industrial control systems and the Industrial Internet of Things, for applications such as public infrastructure (e.g., public water systems and power grids). At SUTD, he was involved in the construction and operation of several practical testbeds in those areas (SWaT, WADI, EPIC). In addition, Nils worked on physical layer security aspects of wireless and embedded systems, for example secure ranging, distance measurements and communication using wireless signals

Andrea Lodi
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10:30 - 11:00

Coffee

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11:00 - 11:30

Alvaro Cardenas, UC, Santa Cruz (USA)

Biography

Alvaro A. Cardenas is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Before joining UCSC he was the Eugene McDermott Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, and a research staff member at Fujitsu Laboratories. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a B.S. from Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia. His research interests focus on cyber-physical systems and IoT security and privacy, including autonomous vehicles, drones, smart home devices, and SCADA systems controlling the power grid and other critical infrastructures. He is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award, the 2018 faculty excellence in research award from the Erik Johnson School of Engineering and Computer Science, the Eugene McDermott Fellow Endowed Chair at UTD, and the Distinguished Service Award from the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Security and Privacy.
Andrea Lodi
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11:30 - 12:00

Magnus Almgren, Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden)

Biography

Magnus Almgren is an Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. He earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Chalmers in 2008, an MSc in Computer Science with distinction in research from Stanford University in 2001, and an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University in 1999. He has worked as a Computer Scientist at SRI International and was part of a cybersecurity research team at IBM Research, Zurich.

His primary focus lies in cybersecurity, specifically within the Internet of Things and cyber-physical systems, such as the power grid, water treatment plants, paper factories, and connected vehicles. Magnus also explores the integration of machine learning and automated reasoning in security contexts.

In 2001, he was honored as a Fulbright scholar. Additionally, over the last years, Magnus has actively pursued commercialization endeavors with two startup companies.

Andrea Lodi
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12:00 - 12:30

Walter Lucia, Concordia University (Canada)

Biography

Dr. Walter is currently an Associate Professor at the Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering, Concordia University, Canada. He received the M.Sc. degree in Automation Engineering (2011) and the Ph.D. degree in Systems and Computer Engineering (2015) from the University of Calabria, Italy. Before joining Concordia University in 2016, he was a visiting research scholar in the ECE Department at Northeastern University (USA) and a visiting postdoctoral researcher in the ECE Department at Carnegie Mellon University (USA). Dr. Lucia is currently an Associate Editor for the Control System Society – Conference Editorial Board, IEEE Systems Journal and Springer Journal of Control, Automation and Electrical Systems. Moreover, Dr. Lucia is currently the Chair of the IEEE Montreal Chapters of Systems, Man and Cybernetics (SMC), and Control Systems (CS). Dr. Lucia’s research interests include constrained control of unmanned vehicles, model predictive control, and secure and resilient control of cyber-physical systems.
Andrea Lodi
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12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

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14:00 - 14:30

Mridula Singh, CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security (Germany)

Abstract

TBC

Biography

TBC
Andrea Lodi
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14:30 - 15:00

Advancing Cyber-Physical System Security: From Anomaly Detection to Hybrid Moving Target Defense

Alessandro Papadopoulos, Mälardalens University (Sweden)

Abstract

In the rapidly evolving landscape of cyber-physical systems (CPS), ensuring security and stability is paramount. This talk delves into two cutting-edge approaches addressing distinct yet interconnected aspects of CPS security. The first part of the talk explores a novel metric, ‘transparency,’ designed to enhance Anomaly Detection Systems (ADS) in CPS. Traditional physics-based methods in ADS, such as CUSUM, face challenges of false positives and undetectable attacks, leading to potentially hazardous conditions. By focusing on sophisticated multi-alarm attacks, this research underscores the limitations of existing zero-alarm attack models and proposes an optimised framework to detect and mitigate state deviations more effectively.

The second part of the talk transitions from detection to control and introduces a hybrid moving target approach. This method builds on moving-target defense mechanisms and focuses on the design of a time-varying controller that shifts closed-loop eigenvalues along radial trajectories. The uniqueness of this approach lies in its ability to maintain system stability without the need for synchronization between the plant and control unit. By examining stability through contraction theory, this research offers a fresh perspective on ensuring robustness against potential adversarial actions in a time-varying system environment.

The talk aims to provide insights into the latest research developments, practical implications, and future directions in enhancing the resilience of cyber-physical systems against sophisticated threats and instabilities.

Biography

Alessandro V. Papadopoulos is a Full Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Mälardalen University, Sweden, and a visiting professor at the University of Malaga, Spain. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. (summa cum laude) degrees in Computer Engineering from Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy. He further earned his Ph.D. degree (Hons.) in Information Technology, specializing in Systems and Control, from Politecnico di Milano in 2013. He was a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Automatic Control, Lund, Sweden (2014-2016), and at Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy (2016). Since 2016, he has been with Mälardalen University, where he was Assistant Professor (2016-2018), Associate Professor (2018-2022), and Full Professor (since 2022).

He was the Program Chair for the Mediterranean Control Conference (MED) 2022, and for the Euromicro Conference on Real-Time Systems (ECRTS) 2023. He serves on the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems and the Leibniz Transactions on Embedded Systems.

In 2020, he was awarded a strategic mobility grant by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), giving him the opportunity to collaborate with ABB (Sweden) on the design of the computing infrastructure of future-generation automation systems. His research interests include control theory, robotics, real-time systems, and distributed systems. His work is funded by a combination of prestigious personal grants, industrial collaborations, and European Union and national projects.

Andrea Lodi
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15:00 - 15:30

Towards Compositional Secure Autonomy: From Perception to Control

Z. Berkay Celik, Purdue University (USA)

Abstract

Autonomous systems, such as self-driving cars, drones, and mobile robots, are rapidly becoming ubiquitous in our society. These systems are composed of multiple individual software components for perception, prediction, planning, and control. While these systems are now blurring the lines between traditional computing systems and human intelligence and revolutionizing markets, a significant gap exists in developing theory and practice that indicates how the behavior of each component can be unified to reason about their system-wide security. This gap is exacerbated by the increasing use of learning-enabled components with inputs from diverse sensors and actuators that operate in open and uncontrolled physical environments.  In this talk, I present the challenges in compositional secure autonomy and principles from our recent efforts on vulnerability discovery and security enforcement to address these challenges. I illustrate these challenges and principles with examples and sample results by focusing on robotic vehicles and autonomous driving. I conclude with a discussion of the open problems and opportunities, and outline areas for defensive research in the future.

Biography

Berkay Celik is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Purdue University, where he is the co-director of the Purdue Security (PurSec) laboratory and a member of the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS). His research investigates the design and evaluation of security for software and systems, specifically on emerging computing platforms and the complex physical environments in which they operate. Through systems design, program analysis, and formal methods, his research seeks to improve security and privacy guarantees in commodity computer systems. His research approach is best illustrated by his extensive work in the security and privacy of the Internet of Things and Cyber-Physical systems, including robotic vehicles, automobiles, and autonomous vehicles. He has received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2022 and Google ASPIRE Research award in 2021, 2022, and 2023. More information about his research group and publication record is available at https://beerkay.github.io.
Andrea Lodi

Symposium Dinner at Turning Torso, Malmö

Bus departs at approx 18.00

Day 3 – April 18, 2024

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09:00 - 09:30

Henrik Sandberg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)

Biography

Henrik Sandberg is Professor at the Division of Decision and Control Systems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. He received the M.Sc. degree in engineering physics and the Ph.D. degree in automatic control from Lund University, Lund, Sweden, in 1999 and 2004, respectively. From 2005 to 2007, he was a Post-Doctoral Scholar at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. In 2013, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) at MIT, Cambridge, USA. He has also held visiting appointments at the Australian National University and the University of Melbourne, Australia. His current research interests include security of cyber-physical systems, power systems, model reduction, and fundamental limitations in control. Dr. Sandberg was a recipient of the Best Student Paper Award from the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control in 2004, an Ingvar Carlsson Award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research in 2007, and a Consolidator Grant from the Swedish Research Council in 2016. He has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and the IFAC Journal Automatica. He is Fellow of the IEEE.
Andrea Lodi
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09:30 - 10:00

Tuomas Aura, Aalto University (Finland)

Biography

Tuomas Aura is a professor at the Department of Computer Science. Professor Aura’s research and teaching area is information security. His
Andrea Lodi
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15:00 - 15:45

Frank Allgöwer, University of Stuttgart (Germany)​

Biography

Frank Allgöwer’s research focus lies in the development of new, high-performance methods of system and control theory and non-linear, networked, predictive and data-based control. Application areas include process control from the point of view of process engineering, mechatronics, biomedical technology and nanotechnology. Another research focus is in the area of systems biology.

Frank Allgöwer is director of the Institute for Systems Theory and Automatic Control at the University of Stuttgart. He is a member of selected academic and university bodies as well as national and international organizations, as well as being the publisher and co-publisher of a range of international journals. For example he has been Vice-President of the German Research Foundation (DFG) from 2012 to 2020, Vice-President of the IEEE Control Systems Society from 2013 to 2014 and Chairman of the VDI-GMA Division for Principles and Methods since 2000. He has received various awards, including the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the German Research Foundation (DFG) in 2004, the Teaching Prize of the State of Baden-Württemberg (2007) and the IFAC Outstanding Service Award of the International Federation of Automatic Control in 2011.
2022, the German Research Foundation awarded Prof. Frank Allgöwer one of the rare Reinhart Koselleck grants. The goal of his project is to develop a new, unified control theory that combines data and models without the need for mathematical system models. This would be the basis for a completely new control theory that promises simpler and more cost-effective applications, for example in manufacturing, digitization or autonomous vehicles.

Andrea Lodi
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10:30 - 11:00

Coffee

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11:00 - 11:30

André Teixeira​, Uppsala University (Sweden)

Biography

Dr. André Teixeira is an Associate Professor at the Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Sweden, where he leads the Secure Learning and Control Lab. He received the M.Sc. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal, in 2009, and the Ph. D. degree in automatic control from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, in 2014. From 2014 to 2015, he was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Automatic Control, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. From October 2015 to August 2017, André was an Assistant Professor in Cybersecurity of Critical Infrastructures at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. From September 2017 to April 2021, he was an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Uppsala University.

His research focuses on secure learning and control systems, particularly developing conceptual and modeling frameworks, methods, and tools for control engineers to analyze and design secure systems that safely interact with the physical world. His current research interests include security and privacy in intelligent control systems, distributed fault detection and isolation, distributed optimization, power systems, and networked dynamical systems. Dr. Teixeira was a recipient of the Best Student-Paper Award from the IEEE Multi-Conference on Systems and Control in 2014, and an Honorable Mention for the Paul M. Frank Award at the IFAC SAFEPROCESS 2018. He was awarded a Starting Grant by the Swedish Research Council in 2018, and he is among the 20 young researchers in Sweden who received the Future Research Leaders 7 grant from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research in 2020. He was awarded the Lilly and Sven Thuréus prize in 2023 by The Royal Society of Sciences at Uppsala. In 2023, he was appointed as a Wallenberg Academy Fellow by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

Andrea Lodi
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11:30 - 12:00

Sibin Mohan, The George Washington University (USA)

Biography

Sibin Mohan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at The George Washington University. He also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Dept. of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Sibin completed his Ph.D. and M.S. in Computer Science from North Carolina State University. His undergraduate degree was in Computer Science and Engineering from Bangalore University, India. In the past, he worked at HP. His research has won multiple best paper awards and he is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award.

Sibin’s research interests are in the area of systems, security, networking and autonomous systems. Sibin has pioneered research to improve the resiliency and security of real-time, cyber-physical and autonomous systems Current research efforts include resiliency and security for CPS, autonomous and IoT-style systems, secure cloud computing, resilient safety-critical systems using software defined networking (SDN), security for V2X systems and understanding the behavior of UAV swarms.

Andrea Lodi
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12:00 - 12:30

Martina Maggio, Lund University (Sweden)

Biography

Martina Maggio is a Professor at the Department of Automatic Control, Lund University since 2023, and at the Computer Science Department, Saarland University since March 2020. She completed her Ph.D. at Politecnico di Milano, spending one year as a visiting graduate student at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. She joined Lund University in 2012 as a postdoctoral researcher, then became an Assistant Professor in 2014, and Docent and Associate Professor in 2017. In 2019, she spent a sabbatical year at Bosch Corporate Research in Renningen, Germany, working on the verification of control systems in presence of computational faults.
Andrea Lodi
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12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

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14:00 - 15:00

Discussions

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15:00 - 15:30

Closing remarks

Mikael Asplund, Linköping University